Scott Wilcox’s Ah-Ha Moment from Oprah Winfrey

Scott Wilcox has been writing music since he was 12 and mother says since only a toddler. But it wasn’t until a lucky break in 2011 that world saw and heard Scott Wilcox for the first time. Scott was a special education teacher in Wisconsin when a student came to him and called him a hypocrite. When he asked why, the student said, “Everyday you tell all your students to find their calling and then follow it with all their passion. But here you are, with all this musical talent and you’re doing nothing with it. Doesn’t that make you a Hypocrite?” After that experience Scott decided to try playing out live. Three weeks in to the experience, he sent a song Called When You Know Better (https://soundcloud.com/scott-wilcox/when-you-know-better) to the Oprah Lifeclass Show. Oprah loved it enough to ask him to sing it live on the show (https://youtu.be/eqKkFmpjtHQ). Since then Scott’s music career has taken off and he plays over 220 shows per year including two annual national tours. Scott won the Bob Dylan Songwriting award in 2012 & 2013 and sang on the Super bowl Babies Choir Commercial for Super Bowl 50 (https://youtu.be/9KqekigARfE). This year Scott’s song Grains of Sand (https://vimeo.com/152129756 Grains of Sand) was rated #1 on the N1M digital music charts and his song Holiday Road was made into a music video (https://youtu.be/LweFONp7yjE).

Scott original music is a soulful acoustic country and blues he calls Americana blues. It comes directly from a front porch in the upper Midwest and resonates to us all. His performances are more than music, they are an experience of stories and music that will make you laugh, reflect and miss home a little bit.

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Exposed Vocals: So tell us your story. Where did you grow up? What made you decide to become an artist?
I grew up the son of a disc jockey in the 70's when radio was king. My father learned to spin records as a Vietnam vet in the Air force in late 60's. I grew up listening to many different styles of music and was raised in back stages, dj booths, and U hauls. My grandfather was a trumpeter for Gene Krupa and Wayne King during the big band era, and my father was a do-wop singer in the 50's. From the age of 3 I was making up songs and by the age of 12 wrote my fist song on piano. I had the fortune of meeting Willie Nelson and Peter Criss as a child and legend has it I was even baby sat by Tina Turner for a short while. After my parents divorced when I was 12, music was the only thing that seemed to hold me together. My Grandpa encouraged me to keep writing while my mother kept telling me, "Remember Scott, music is a hobby, so don't quit your day job." So Like an idiot, I listened. Although I went to college, worked several jobs and careers, I kept writing and singing. Till one day I wrote just the right song, and Oprah asked me to sing it on her show..
Exposed Vocals: Since everyone was a start-up once, can you give any smaller or local bands or artists looking to get gigs and airplay some tips?
Never give up. Oprah told me this: "Stop listening to the outside voices of people who tell you what you should do, and start listening to your inner voice, the only voice you know to be true." We fill ourselves with alot of BS, all the time, with all the reason why we think we are not good enough, not successful enough, not handsome or pretty enough, not young enough... Its all BS. The only think holding you back from your dream is your own personal fear. Conquer the fear and the road will open.
Exposed Vocals: Do you ever make mistakes during performances? How do you handle that?
Everyone makes mistakes. the first thing you need to learn as a performer is that your audience is on the same journey you are. They want you to succeed and be great. they will overlook mistakes if you do. Accept that no one is perfect and that perfection should not be your goal. Your goal is to give a gift to your audience. Give them such an experience that they leave with more than the they came. Make them feel that your performance was part of a growth process or a necessary step forward, and you will have them for life.
Exposed Vocals: Do you tour? Anything interesting happen on tour that you think our readers would enjoy hearing about?
I usually do two annual tours per year. During each tour I try to do some fun things to keep my fans involved during the tour so they can keep checking in. Last tour I did a live cooking show called the rest stop cooking show where I stopped at a rest stop, got out my propane cooker and cooked something simple and fun.
Exposed Vocals: Any planned studio upgrades? What are you working with now?
I am currently working on my 5th album. Any name suggestions?
Exposed Vocals: How do you find ways to promote your music? What works best for you?
I think promoting music is one of the hardest things to do. It has to be new and interesting in a way that is constantly changing to keep people interested. I used primarily Facebook, Twitter and a couple other social media sites, to direct people to my website. But I'm always looking for better ways.
Exposed Vocals: If you could perform anywhere and with any artists (Dead or Alive) where and who would it be with? Why?
I'd like to perform with CCR in my backyard. Why not?
Exposed Vocals: So, what’s next? Any new upcoming projects that you want to talk about?
I'm currently working on my 5th album and planning a tour out west in April called the Mid2West Tour.
Exposed Vocals: If you weren’t making music, what would you be doing?
Probably still teaching.
Exposed Vocals: What should fans look forward to in the next year or so?
Watch for a national tour to California and back in April, and possibly a European tour toward the end of the year. Also I will be finishing my 5th album which might possibly be a double album.
Exposed Vocals: Any Shout-outs?
Special thanks to all the venues that have supported me throughout the past 5 years, in particular, House of Embers in the Wis. Dells, Vernon Vineyards in Viroqua, the Manitou Grill in White Bear Lake, MN, and many, many more. I can't thank you enough for your continued support of my music. I'd also like to thank my wife Brenda and my kids for sticking with me all these years and my good friends for never giving up on me. I've been very blessed and as I've always said I am a product of so many people's love and support and I am eternally grateful.